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Item ID: tp0015   Source ID: 2

Description: Our customizable tear sheet pads feature detailed content approved by URAC's Health Web Site Accreditation Program combined with educational medical illustrations. Tear sheets are proven, inexpensive handouts that facilitate informed consent and improve patient compliance while functioning as a valuable branding and contact information tool.

Product Specifications:... More

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Our customizable tear sheet pads feature detailed content approved by URAC's Health Web Site Accreditation Program combined with educational medical illustrations. Tear sheets are proven, inexpensive handouts that facilitate informed consent and improve patient compliance while functioning as a valuable branding and contact information tool.

Product Specifications: 8.5 x 11 inches, 50 tear sheets, two-sided information (full color front side, one-color back side), printed on heavy white stock, sturdy cardboard back, detailed medical illustrations in color and continuous tone, space available for overprinting of contact information (additional charge may apply).

This tear sheet pad contains the following information:

Diagnostic procedure done to detect problems with the heart and its blood supply.

Reasons for Procedure This procedure is generally done as a diagnostic test after a person experiences chest pains or other symptoms that could point to a problem with the heart.

Cardiac catheterization helps doctors to: โ€ข Check for congenital heart defects โ€ข Decide on an appropriate treatment โ€ข Determine how well the four chambers of the heart are functioning โ€ข Evaluate an enlarged heart โ€ข Evaluate the heart valves' functioning โ€ข Identify narrowed or clogged arteries leading to or within the heart โ€ข Measure blood pressure within the heart

What to Expect Prior to Procedure Your doctor will likely do the following: โ€ข Blood and urine studies โ€ข Chest x-ray โ€ข Electrocardiogram (ECG, EKG) โ€“ a test that records the heart's activity by measuring electrical currents through the heart muscle โ€ข Stress test

In the days leading up to your procedure: โ€ข Arrange for a ride to and from the procedure โ€ข The night before, do not eat or drink anything after midnight (except for liquids taken with medication)

During Procedure: IV fluids and medications, fluoroscopy, EKG, anesthesia, possibly a sedative

Anesthesia: Local anesthesia applied to the insertion site, and possibly a mild sedative given one hour before the procedure or via IV during procedure

Risk Factors for Complications During the Procedure โ€ข Obesity โ€ข Allergies to medications, shellfish, or x-ray dye โ€ข Bleeding disorder โ€ข Debilitation โ€ข Kidney Disease โ€ข Pre-existing heart or lung conditions โ€ข Serious recent or chronic illness

Description of the Procedure: You'll be awake, but given sedation so that you'll be more relaxed and less anxious. Your doctor asks you to perform basic functions such as coughing, exhaling, and holding your breath. A clear plastic hood may be placed briefly over your head to measure the air you exhale and determine your heart's pumping efficiency. If you feel any chest pain, dizziness, nausea, tingling, or other discomfort, tell your doctor.

The catheter is threaded over a guide wire, inserted into an artery in your arm or leg, and fed up and into the heart. Your doctor watches the threading and placement of the catheter via a fluoroscope, which is a type of x-ray that takes pictures of moving organs.

Once in the heart, the guide wire is removed. The catheter is then used to measure blood pressure within the heart's different chambers and to take blood samples.

Dye is injected though the catheter and into the coronary arteries. Multiple x-ray images are taken to allow identification of any disease in the coronary arteries. An aortogram, which gives a clear image of the aorta, may also be performed at this time. The catheter is then removed.

After Procedure: โ€ข A sandbag may be placed over your groin to exert pressure on the artery used for catheterization and prevent bleeding โ€ข EKG and blood studies are done โ€ข If catheter was inserted in your groin you will be required to lie flat on your back for at least six hours. During this time a catheter may be inserted in your bladder to assist with urination. โ€ข If the catheter was inserted in your arm, you will be required to keep your arm perfectly straight using a stiff arm board, but you will be allowed out of bed within 2 hours โ€ข You will be encouraged to drink lots of fluids to flush the x-ray dye from your system

How Long Will It Take? The actual procedure takes 1-2 hours and pre-procedure tests take 1-2 hours.

Will It Hurt? Although the procedure is generally not painful, it can cause some discomfort, including: โ€ข A flushing feeling or nausea when the dye is injected โ€ข Burning sensation (when skin at catheter insertion site is anesthetized) โ€ข Headache โ€ข Heart palpitations โ€ข Pressure when catheter is inserted or replaced with other catheters

Pain medication will be given when necessary.

Possible Complications: Complications are rare, but can include: โ€ข Accumulation of fluid in the heart sac that can interfere with the heart pumping and adequately circulating blood, called pericardial tamponade โ€ข Allergic reaction to x-ray dye โ€ข Arrhythmias (abnormal heart beats) โ€ข Bleeding at point of catheter insertion โ€ข Blood clots, possibly resulting in heart attack, stroke, kidney damage, lung injury, or damage to arms or legs โ€ข Heart attack โ€ข Infection โ€ข Perforation or other damage to arteries

Average Hospital Stay: 0-1 days

Post-operative Care: โ€ข Bathe and shower as usual, but keep the wound dry and covered with a bandage for the first 2-3 days after surgery โ€ข Change the dressing around catheter incision area as instructed โ€ข Do not lift heavy objects or engage in any strenuous exercise or sexual activity for a minimum of 24 hours โ€ข If you are diagnosed with heart valve disease, you may be given antibiotics to avoid valve infection or endocarditis; take all of the antibiotic prescribed, even if you do not feel ill โ€ข Take medications as instructed โ€ข Use acetaminophen for pain relief, not aspirin or ibuprofen โ€ข Use an electric heating pad or warm compress to relieve pain at the catheter insertion site

Outcome: The test results are generally available within 24 hours of the procedure. At that point, your doctor will discuss the findings and suggest appropriate treatment options. In some cases, the results can indicate an immediate need for surgery.

Call Your Doctor If Any of the Following Occurs: โ€ข Cough, shortness of breath, chest pain, or severe nausea or vomiting โ€ข Difficulty breathing โ€ข Extreme pain, including chest pain โ€ข Extreme sweating or nausea โ€ข Leg feels cold, turns white or blue, or becomes numb or tingly โ€ข Redness, swelling, increasing pain, excessive bleeding, or discharge at point of catheter insertion โ€ข Signs of infection, including fever and chills

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