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Item ID: tp0011   Source ID: 2

Description: Our customizable tear sheet pads feature detailed content approved by URAC's Health Web Site Accreditation Program combined with educational medical illustrations. Tear sheets are proven, inexpensive handouts that facilitate informed consent and improve patient compliance while functioning as a valuable branding and contact information tool.

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Our customizable tear sheet pads feature detailed content approved by URAC's Health Web Site Accreditation Program combined with educational medical illustrations. Tear sheets are proven, inexpensive handouts that facilitate informed consent and improve patient compliance while functioning as a valuable branding and contact information tool.

Product Specifications: 8.5 x 11 inches, 50 tear sheets, two-sided information (full color front side, one-color back side), printed on heavy white stock, sturdy cardboard back, detailed medical illustrations in color and continuous tone, space available for overprinting of contact information (additional charge may apply).

This tear sheet pad contains the following information:

Surgery to relieve pressure on the median nerve in the wrist. Carpal tunnel syndrome is caused by pressure on the median nerve. This may occur when people use their hands and wrists repeatedly in the same way. It also may occur as the result of certain illnesses such as rheumatoid arthritis.

Reasons for Procedure The median nerve passes through the wrist and into the hand through the carpal tunnel. The carpal tunnel is made up of the bones of the wrist and a strong, fibrous ligament called the transverse carpal ligament, which is located on the palmar aspect of the wrist.

The ligament and the bones make a firm tunnel. When the sheaths of the finger tendons, which slide through the carpal tunnel, become inflamed or thickened, this puts pressure on the median nerve, causing it to malfunction. This results in numbness and tingling in the thumb, index finger, middle finger, and part of the fourth finger, plus a weakening of the hand's grasp. This is called carpal tunnel syndrome. Surgery to treat carpal tunnel syndrome is usually recommended in these cases:

โ€ข Other therapies have failed, including icing, splints or braces, anti-inflammatory medications, steroid injections, physical therapy, or ultrasound โ€ข Studies of nerve functioning reveal that the median nerve is malfunctioning due to its compression within the carpal tunnel โ€ข There is shrinkage (atrophy) and weakness of the muscles controlling the thumb

What to Expect Prior to Procedure Your doctor will likely do the following: โ€ข Electromyogram (EMG) โ€“ a recording of the electrical currents generated in an active muscle โ€ข MRI scan (rarely done) โ€“ a test that uses magnetic waves to make pictures of the inside of the body โ€ข Nerve conduction studies โ€“ which measure the ability of the nerve to send impulses to the muscles of the thumb โ€ข Physical exam, concentrating on strength and sensation in the affected hand or hands

In the days leading up to your procedure: โ€ข Arrange for a ride to and from the procedure โ€ข Arrange for help at home after the procedure โ€ข The night before, eat a light meal and do not eat or drink anything after midnight โ€ข You may be asked to shower the morning of your procedure, and you may be given special antibacterial soap to use

During Procedure โ€“ Anesthesia or sedation

Anesthesia - General, or local with sedation

Description of the Procedure Carpal tunnel release may be done with a classic open incision or with the newer endoscopic techniques: 1. Open carpal tunnel release: The surgeon makes a 3-5 inch incision in the lower palm and wrist area, opens the carpal ligament and frees the median nerve. The incision is then closed with stitches, and a bulky bandage is applied to the wound. 2. Endoscopic carpal tunnel release: A tiny, 1/2- inch incision is made on the palmar aspect of the wrist, through which a miniature fiberoptic camera is passed. This camera allows the surgeon to view the inside of the carpal tunnel on a monitor in the operating room. Another tiny incision is made, into which surgical instruments are passed. While looking at the monitor, these instruments are used to release the carpal ligament and free the median nerve. After the camera and instruments are removed, a few stitches are necessary to close the incisions, and a bulky bandage is placed over the wounds.

After Procedure Your hand and wrist will be wrapped in a bulky bandage and elevated to control swelling. Ice packs may be applied periodically.

How Long Will It Take? 15-60 minutes

Will It Hurt? Anesthesia prevents pain during the procedure, but once the anesthesia wears off you will experience some pain and tenderness in the area of the incision(s).

Possible Complications: โ€ข Bleeding โ€ข Continued numbness, tingling, weakness, or pain โ€ข During the endoscopic procedure, if there are any problems, the surgeon may need to revert to the traditional open carpal tunnel release โ€ข Infection โ€ข Nerve damage โ€ข Stiffness of the fingers โ€ข Swelling

Average Hospital Stay - None

Postoperative Care: โ€ข Apply an ice pack to your wrist and hand for 20 minutes at a time, every 3-4 hours over the first couple of days after your procedure โ€ข Arrange to have help around the house, especially if you've had both hands operated on โ€ข Do not lift heavy things or strain the hand and arm, until you are advised that you may do so by your surgeon โ€ข Follow the exercise program recommended by your surgeon once you've begun to heal โ€ข If your bandage becomes soiled, your surgeon may advise you to change it or may ask you to see him or her โ€ข Keep your hand elevated for several days, to decrease swelling and pain โ€ข Return to your surgeon in 7-10 days to have the stitches removed โ€ข Since many cases of carpal tunnel syndrome are believed to occur due to repetitive actions (often occupational injury), check with your doctor about how to prevent a recurrence

Outcome You may have to wear a brace or splint for several weeks after surgery. Complete recovery may take four weeks or longer. But rather quickly, the numbness or tingling in your hand and fingers should improve. Your grasp strength will very slowly begin to improve. You may be given special exercises or be advised to attend physical therapy in order to further improve the strength and mobility of your hand and fingers.

Call Your Doctor If Any of the Following Occurs โ€ข Cough, shortness of breath, or chest pain โ€ข Increased tingling or weakness in your hand โ€ข Nausea and/or vomiting that you can't control with the medications you were given after surgery, or which persist for more than two days after discharge from the hospital โ€ข Pain that you can't control with the medications you've been given โ€ข Redness, swelling, increasing pain, excessive bleeding, or any discharge from the incision site โ€ข Signs of infection, which include fever, chills, or increased pain

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