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Item ID: tp0030   Source ID: 2

Description: Product Specifications: 8.5 x 11 inches or 5.5x 8.5 inches; 50 tear sheets, two-sided information (full color front side, one-color back side), printed on white stock, sturdy cardboard back, detailed medical illustrations in color and continuous tone, space available for overprinting of contact information or product may be customized with new artwork or text... More

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Product Specifications: 8.5 x 11 inches or 5.5x 8.5 inches; 50 tear sheets, two-sided information (full color front side, one-color back side), printed on white stock, sturdy cardboard back, detailed medical illustrations in color and continuous tone, space available for overprinting of contact information or product may be customized with new artwork or text (additional charge may apply).

This tear sheet pad contains the following information:

Kidney Transplant Definition

A surgical procedure to remove a severely diseased and damaged kidney and replace it with a healthy kidney from a donor. The donor may be a living relative, a close friend whose tissue closely matches yours, or someone who has died and donated his or her organs.

Parts of the Body Involved

Kidney, blood vessels, ureters Reasons for Procedure

A kidney transplant is done to treat irreversible, end-stage kidney diseases. The procedure is most often performed when the kidneys fail for the following reasons:

* Damage from severe pyelonephritis inflammation in the kidney, often due to bacterial infection)
* Diabetes
* Glomerulonephritis (a kidney disorder)
* High blood pressure that destroys the kidneys
* Polycystic kidney disease

Risk Factors for Complications during the Procedure

* Age extreme (young or old), of either the recipient or the donor
* Autoimmune disease
* Cancer
* Certain infections, such as osteomyelitis, tuberculosis, hepatitis
* Conditions that will likely result in a recurrence of kidney failure in the new kidney
* Difference in race between the recipient and donor
* Pre-existing medical conditions, especially certain heart, lung, and/or liver diseases
* Pregnancy
* Prior blood transfusion
* Prior failed transplant

What to Expect

Prior to Procedure

Because of a shortage of donors, you may be on a transplant list for some time. You may need to carry a pager or cellular phone at all times so that the transplant team can reach you if a donor kidney becomes available.

Your doctor will likely do the following:

* Blood tests
* Chest x-ray
* Electrocardiogram (ECG, EKG) - a test that records the heart's activity by measuring electrical currents through the heart muscle
* Extensive tissue typing
* Physical exam
* Review of medications

You may be asked to undergo psychological testing and counseling to ensure that you are well-prepared for the stress of this procedure.

The days leading up to your procedure:

* Arrange for help at home after returning from the hospital
* Continue renal dialysis as directed by your doctor
* Take medications as directed and do not take over-the-counter medications without checking with your doctor
* The night before, eat a light meal and do not eat or drink anything after midnight unless told otherwise by your doctor

During Procedure - IV fluids, antibiotics, anesthesia

Anesthesia - General

Description of the Procedure - The surgeon cuts into the lower abdomen and connects the donated kidney to your arteries, veins, and ureter, which carries urine to the bladder. The diseased kidneys are usually left in place. The incision is closed. Your new kidney may start producing urine immediately or within a short time.

After Procedure - A catheter in your bladder that is connected to a bag collecting urine

How Long Will It Take? 3-6 hours

Will It Hurt? Anesthesia prevents pain during surgery. You may experience pain while recovering, but you will receive pain medication to relieve this discomfort.

Possible Complications:

* Blood clot in the bladder or vein connected to the kidney
* Damage to blood vessels or nerves
* Excessive swelling of your wound or legs
* Gastrointestinal ulcers (sores in the lining of the stomach or intestines)
* Heart problems from prior heart disease (such as heart attacks, heart failure, or heart rhythm problems)
* Infection
* Leakage from ureter
* Phlebitis (blood clots of a vein)
* Post-operative diabetes
* Rejection of the new kidney

You are also specifically at higher risk for activation or progression of a number of diseases due to the use of immunosuppressive drugs, including:

* Infections like tuberculosis or AIDS if you are infected before surgery
* Liver disease if you have hepatitis C or B
* Recurrence of cancer

Average Hospital Stay: 1-2 weeks

Postoperative Care:

* Expect to get out of bed the day after surgery
* Only take medications approved by your doctor
* Take deep breaths and cough 10 to 20 times every hour to decrease the risk of fluid building up in your lungs and pneumonia
* The amount of salt and protein you eat may be restricted
* You may be asked to avoid alcohol for at least a year
* You may be asked to weigh yourself and take your blood pressure daily, and to measure the amount of fluids you take in as well as the amount of urine you pass
* You may be given diuretic medications to help rid your body of accumulated fluid
* You may be given steroid medications to decrease inflammation in your new kidney
* You will be started on drugs to suppress your immune function and therefore decrease the risk that your body will reject your new kidney
* Your new kidney may be monitored via ultrasound examinations and nuclear medicine scans

Outcome

After a period of recuperation, you will most likely be able to return to work and normal activities.

To reduce the chance that your body will reject the donor kidney, you will need to take immunosuppressive drugs for the rest of your life. Additional drugs may be ordered to manage side effects. These drugs may increase your risk of developing cancer, kidney disease (in the new kidney), and weak bones.

More than 80% of transplanted kidneys from cadaver donors remain working after one year. The success rate often improves with a kidney from a living donor, because the donated tissue usually more closely matches your tissue. Call Your Doctor If Any of the Following Occurs

* Cough, shortness of breath, chest pain, or severe nausea or vomiting
* Coughing up blood
* High blood pressure
* Malaise
* Pain and/or swelling in your feet, calves, or legs, or sudden shortness of breath or chest pain
* Pain, burning, urgency, frequency of urination, or persistent bleeding in the urine
* Passing no or only small amounts of urine
* Redness, swelling, increasing pain, excessive bleeding, or discharge from the incision site
* Signs of infection, including fever and chills
* Sudden headache or feeling faint
* Weight gain greater than three pounds in one day

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